Platterday

David Hepworth plays records on Saturdays
Colin Blunstone has been the voice on some of my favourite records: “She’s Not There”, “Say You Don’t Mind” and “I Don’t Believe In Miracles”, which is the first track on this record, which came out in 1972.

Colin Blunstone has been the voice on some of my favourite records: “She’s Not There”, “Say You Don’t Mind” and “I Don’t Believe In Miracles”, which is the first track on this record, which came out in 1972.

1965. One of pop’s strangest moments. A group from Texas present themselves as English by pretending that one of them is a knight. Then again, it’s no stranger than a bunch of lads from Surrey calling themselves the Yardbirds.

1965. One of pop’s strangest moments. A group from Texas present themselves as English by pretending that one of them is a knight. Then again, it’s no stranger than a bunch of lads from Surrey calling themselves the Yardbirds.

The thing about record buying was the foreplay. Hearing John Peel say their names, often months before you got to see them in a record shop. Then you’d go back and visit them in the shop, learning the names of the tracks and reading the sleeve notes. This came out in 1965. Don’t think I bought it until 1980. That’s 15 years of foreplay.

The thing about record buying was the foreplay. Hearing John Peel say their names, often months before you got to see them in a record shop. Then you’d go back and visit them in the shop, learning the names of the tracks and reading the sleeve notes. This came out in 1965. Don’t think I bought it until 1980. That’s 15 years of foreplay.

Could write a long piece about how this is the true beginning point of “indie”. But it’s a point you either get or you don’t.

Could write a long piece about how this is the true beginning point of “indie”. But it’s a point you either get or you don’t.

This was recorded in 1972 after Gram Parsons and Sneaky Pete had left, when they were playing a combination of bar band soul covers, Parsons songs and bluegrass tunes showcasing Byron Berline’s fiddle. It’s actually one of my favourite live albums. It’s just got a spirit, particularly towards the end of side two, that few records have. Listening to it just now for the first time in ages I wonder for the first time how live it is. The audience don’t sound real and they don’t credit a venue, which is very unusual. It was engineered by Eddie Kramer who I talked to not long ago. Should have asked him.

This was recorded in 1972 after Gram Parsons and Sneaky Pete had left, when they were playing a combination of bar band soul covers, Parsons songs and bluegrass tunes showcasing Byron Berline’s fiddle. It’s actually one of my favourite live albums. It’s just got a spirit, particularly towards the end of side two, that few records have. Listening to it just now for the first time in ages I wonder for the first time how live it is. The audience don’t sound real and they don’t credit a venue, which is very unusual. It was engineered by Eddie Kramer who I talked to not long ago. Should have asked him.

People miss the point about great sleeves. They weren’t just wrappers for records. In some cases they made listening to the actual record redundant.

People miss the point about great sleeves. They weren’t just wrappers for records. In some cases they made listening to the actual record redundant.

Talking to Pete Paphides yesterday. When he DJs in front of hip young things the music they most want to hear is Talking Heads. Haven’t played this for years. Never quite forgave it for not having Love > Building On Fire on it.

Talking to Pete Paphides yesterday. When he DJs in front of hip young things the music they most want to hear is Talking Heads. Haven’t played this for years. Never quite forgave it for not having Love > Building On Fire on it.

In the 60s they were all singles acts.

In the 60s they were all singles acts.

This came with a 7” flexi-disc of another tune. Since it sat under the stylus, it must have been finished by hand, which is a lot of trouble to go to for a Fairport spin-off group. Did I lose it? Of course I did. I never heard anyone use the expression “collectors-item” about records of any kind until they’d stopped making them.

This came with a 7” flexi-disc of another tune. Since it sat under the stylus, it must have been finished by hand, which is a lot of trouble to go to for a Fairport spin-off group. Did I lose it? Of course I did. I never heard anyone use the expression “collectors-item” about records of any kind until they’d stopped making them.

That picture was taken in 1968, which is forty-five years ago. If you went to a festival this month you’d expect to see at least one band channeling the same look.

That picture was taken in 1968, which is forty-five years ago. If you went to a festival this month you’d expect to see at least one band channeling the same look.