Platterday

David Hepworth plays records on Saturdays
My copy of Kate Bush’s “Hounds Of Love” from 1985, with Brian Southall’s accompanying press release.

My copy of Kate Bush’s “Hounds Of Love” from 1985, with Brian Southall’s accompanying press release.

Came out in 1975 when they were still saying “this stereo record can be played on mono reproducers provided a compatible of stereo cartridge wired for mono is fitted”.

Came out in 1975 when they were still saying “this stereo record can be played on mono reproducers provided a compatible of stereo cartridge wired for mono is fitted”.

Taj Mahal has been making albums since the late sixties and, like Richard Thompson and Emmylou Harris, who have been going almost as long, he’s never put out a dull one, a pretentious one or one that was flawed by over-neediness. This was made in 1979 for a short-lived “direct to disc” label.

Taj Mahal has been making albums since the late sixties and, like Richard Thompson and Emmylou Harris, who have been going almost as long, he’s never put out a dull one, a pretentious one or one that was flawed by over-neediness. This was made in 1979 for a short-lived “direct to disc” label.

Another record which bears out the adage that there’s nothing new in music, just old things you didn’t know about. This Joe Tex record’s called “From The Roots Came The Rapper” and it came out in 1972. 

Another record which bears out the adage that there’s nothing new in music, just old things you didn’t know about. This Joe Tex record’s called “From The Roots Came The Rapper” and it came out in 1972. 

Colin Blunstone has been the voice on some of my favourite records: “She’s Not There”, “Say You Don’t Mind” and “I Don’t Believe In Miracles”, which is the first track on this record, which came out in 1972.

Colin Blunstone has been the voice on some of my favourite records: “She’s Not There”, “Say You Don’t Mind” and “I Don’t Believe In Miracles”, which is the first track on this record, which came out in 1972.

1965. One of pop’s strangest moments. A group from Texas present themselves as English by pretending that one of them is a knight. Then again, it’s no stranger than a bunch of lads from Surrey calling themselves the Yardbirds.

1965. One of pop’s strangest moments. A group from Texas present themselves as English by pretending that one of them is a knight. Then again, it’s no stranger than a bunch of lads from Surrey calling themselves the Yardbirds.

The thing about record buying was the foreplay. Hearing John Peel say their names, often months before you got to see them in a record shop. Then you’d go back and visit them in the shop, learning the names of the tracks and reading the sleeve notes. This came out in 1965. Don’t think I bought it until 1980. That’s 15 years of foreplay.

The thing about record buying was the foreplay. Hearing John Peel say their names, often months before you got to see them in a record shop. Then you’d go back and visit them in the shop, learning the names of the tracks and reading the sleeve notes. This came out in 1965. Don’t think I bought it until 1980. That’s 15 years of foreplay.

Could write a long piece about how this is the true beginning point of “indie”. But it’s a point you either get or you don’t.

Could write a long piece about how this is the true beginning point of “indie”. But it’s a point you either get or you don’t.

This was recorded in 1972 after Gram Parsons and Sneaky Pete had left, when they were playing a combination of bar band soul covers, Parsons songs and bluegrass tunes showcasing Byron Berline’s fiddle. It’s actually one of my favourite live albums. It’s just got a spirit, particularly towards the end of side two, that few records have. Listening to it just now for the first time in ages I wonder for the first time how live it is. The audience don’t sound real and they don’t credit a venue, which is very unusual. It was engineered by Eddie Kramer who I talked to not long ago. Should have asked him.

This was recorded in 1972 after Gram Parsons and Sneaky Pete had left, when they were playing a combination of bar band soul covers, Parsons songs and bluegrass tunes showcasing Byron Berline’s fiddle. It’s actually one of my favourite live albums. It’s just got a spirit, particularly towards the end of side two, that few records have. Listening to it just now for the first time in ages I wonder for the first time how live it is. The audience don’t sound real and they don’t credit a venue, which is very unusual. It was engineered by Eddie Kramer who I talked to not long ago. Should have asked him.

People miss the point about great sleeves. They weren’t just wrappers for records. In some cases they made listening to the actual record redundant.

People miss the point about great sleeves. They weren’t just wrappers for records. In some cases they made listening to the actual record redundant.